Prostate Cancer Genomic-risk Differences Between African-American and White Men Across Gleason Score

Prostate Cancer Genomic-risk Differences Between African-American and White Men Across Gleason Scores


Brandon A Mahal, Mohammed Alshalalfa, Daniel E Spratt, Elai Davicioni, Shuang G Zhao, Felix Y Feng, Timothy R Rebbeck, Paul L Nguyen, Franklin W Huang


African-American men have poorer prostate cancer-specific outcomes compared with white men [1]. Emerging evidence suggests that racial disparities in advanced stage or higher-grade disease may be predominantly accounted for by social factors and healthcare access [2,3]. In contrast, there is growing evidence to support the hypothesis that disparities in low-grade Gleason 6 disease may be in part driven by underlying tumor differences [3,4]. Although low-grade (Gleason 6) disease is considered prognostically favorable, it is associated with a diverse genomic landscape that can sometimes include aggressive genomic features [5].


Full text: https://www.europeanurology.com/article/S0302-2838(19)30011-9/fulltext

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